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Termite-Induced Damage To Dykes And Dams Can Cause The Structures To Collapse, Resulting In Widespread Disaster

The Formosan subterranean termite species is often cited by experts as being the most destructive termite species in existence. The scientific name for this species, Coptotermes formosanus, is often confused with the name of another destructive termite species, Odontotermes formosanus. Both of these species are native to China, but the Coptotermes formosanus species has spread all over the world by means of maritime travel. Although the Odontotermes formosanus species only dwells in Asia, and is therefore less destructive than the Formosan termite species, Odontotermes formosanus is unique among termite species due to its habit of inflicting serious structural damages to dams and dykes. While termite destruction is typically limited to a single house or building, numerous studies show that Odontotermes formosanus pest activity can lead to the collapse of dams and dykes, which would result in widespread destruction and a massive loss of life.

The  Odontotermes formosanus species is commonly known as the black-winged subterranean termite. These termites have been found digging three foot deep cavities into many dams and dykes located in southern China. Furthermore, these termites build extensive networks of tunnels throughout these structures. These internal tunnels weaken the structure, and the resulting damage causes dams and dykes to absorb and retain unusually large amounts of water. When the internal structure of dams and dykes become saturated with large amounts of water, complete collapse can result.

The Odontotermes formosanus species of termite is the most destructive dam/pest in the world. According to an investigation, when totaling all river dikes and reservoir dams that are 15 years or older within China’s 14 southern provinces, 90 percent were found to have sustained damage from the Odontotermes formosanus termite species. The economic cost of termite-induced damage to dams and dikes in Asia costs hundreds of millions of American dollars each year. Researchers in China have been working for decades to develop a pest control strategy that could be applied to structures like dams and dikes, but no effective control measure has yet been produced.

Do you think that continuous termite activity within dams and/or dikes could result in collapse, and therefore, mass flooding in urban areas?

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