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Hairy Trapdoor Spiders Appear Around Texas Homes After Bouts Of Rain, And They Are Commonly Found In Pool Filters

Spiders of all shapes and sizes are abundant within the state of Texas, and the vast majority do not inflict medically significant bites to humans. Most experts agree that only two spider species within the United States produce venom that can cause serious medical issues, and possibly death. These spiders include the brown recluse (L. reclusa) and the black widow (L. mactans) species, both of which can be found in Texas. However, there exists other spider species that can inflict bites that may lead to serious medical conditions, such as tissue necrosis, but such cases are very rare.

According to officials with the Texas Parks and Wildlife agency, Texas is home to 900 documented spider species, but according to one scientific survey, at least 1,084 spider species have been documented in Texas. In any case, spiders in Texas are plentiful, and many are large, hairy, and generally look terrifying to a great number of people. Unfortunately, for arachnophobes living in Texas, large spiders often gravitate onto properties, and sometimes into homes in the state. For example, trapdoor spiders often appear in residential areas of Texas, particularly within the dry southwestern region of the state. These spiders are often mistaken for tarantulas due to their large size and hairy exterior. And much like most tarantulas, bites from trapdoor spiders are reported as being painful, but harmless. Residents of southwest Texas can expect to find trapdoor spiders crawling around their home after bouts of rainfall, and oddly enough, these spiders are often found within pool filters.

Trapdoor spiders of the southwest dwell within burrows that can be as deep as ten feet and around one inch in width. These burrows become flooded during bouts of rainfall, prompting the spiders to evacuate their burrow and wander into residential areas. It is not uncommon for residents to find a trapdoor spider at the bottom of their pool or within the pool’s filters. Although trapdoor spiders found within these odd locations may seem dead, they usually begin moving again before eventually crawling away after they are fished out of pools.

Have you ever found a spider of any sort within a swimming pool?

 

 

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